Loading...

Sex anxiety How can you overcome it

 

Sex anxiety: How can you overcome it

Sex anxiety: How can you overcome it

Whether you're a woman or a man, you might have experienced sexual anxiety over the years. Feeling anxious sometimes about our prowess between the sheets is normal, but when it happens repeatedly, this can affect our quality of life. So, what can you do to dispel the doubts and lead a healthy sex life?
How can you move past the anxiety that keeps you from enjoying your sex life?

Sexual anxiety — or sexual performance anxiety — is something that affects men and women of all ages, regardless of how much experience they have with intercourse.

For some, this type of anxiety is short-lived and may appear briefly in the wake of a new sexual encounter.

Other people, however, might find it difficult to enjoy a wholesome sex life because of it, and they may experience this type of anxiety with more regularity.

But how does sexual anxiety manifest? Well, according to sex therapist Claudia Six, it has different expressions among men and women, though in most instances, it is related to the fear that some aspect of their presence between the sheets may be disappointing for their partner.

"In women, sexual performance anxiety can show up as difficulty getting interested in sex, difficulty getting aroused, or difficulty with orgasm. In men, we know what it looks like — difficulty getting an erection, keeping an erection, or coming too soon. I put all that under the umbrella term of 'sexual performance anxiety.'"

Claudia Six

And why do we feel sexual performance anxiety? Here, the matters get a little more complex, but to simplify: we tend to become insecure about how well we do in bed or what we may look like to our partners, or we may simply be daunted by the idea of becoming so intimate with someone.

In some cases, sexual performance anxiety stems from a past traumatic experience — perhaps related to sexual violence. If that is your situation, please do not hesitate to seek out specialist advice. 

But, in most cases — as sex educator Amy Jo Goddard explains - this response is conditioned by the way in which we were brought up to think about certain aspects of sex and our own bodies, and by social expectations that impact our relationship with our own sexuality.

Below, we give you some tips about how to tackle these moments of uncertainty and worry both before and during sexual encounters, so you can enjoy happier, healthier sex life.


Contact us

Inquiry form

Contact Us